Walter Miranda
Plastic Artist

Works of the artist

Listing 43 items – Series

Requiem to Gaia

From the seattle project series: The heart of Gaia - 2

2020

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Seattle Project

    – Requiem to Gaia

From the seattle project series:- The brothers of man - 2

2020

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Seattle Project

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - Fecundationis Artificiosae

2018

    – Objects

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - Foucault ICU

2018

    – Objects

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Objects

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - Inside Out

2018

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - In splendid cradle

2018

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - In Totum 8

2018

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - Tower of Babel

2018

    – Objects

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Objects

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - Universalis Cosmographia - II

2018

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - Universalis Cosmographia - I

2018

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Our daily electronic junk!

2017

    – Objects

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Objects

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - Romantic Cartography

2017

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia – In Totum 5

2017

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia - In Totum 7

2017

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem for Gaia – In Totum 8

2017

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Mismatch I

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Mismatch Ii

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Mismatch Iii

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Technological Unbalance

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Natural Balance

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Is In The Eye Of The Beholder 1

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Is In The Eye Of The Beholder 2

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

The North Is Here I

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

The North Is Here Ii

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Spatial Occupation

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Technological Reflections

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

Requiem to Gaia - Waterless

2014

    – Philosophical Issues

    – Cartographies of Gaia

    – Requiem to Gaia

More works 'Réquiem a Gaia'

The art of turning difficulties into advantages


 



 


 


 The plastic artist Walter Miranda considers himself a defender of the technique in painting. Among its arguments is that, to fly higher, it is necessary to know how to spend less energy, which means that the knowledge brings better and better results in any activity.


 


Between last July and August, he presented the exhibition Requiem to Gaia - In Totum, at the Unesp Rectory. The activity is part of Project 15x15, a partnership between the University, through its Arts and Culture Committee linked to the rectory of University Extension, and the Professional Association of Plastic Artists of São Paulo, of which Miranda is president in the triennium 2013 / 2015


 


Miranda has shown maps alerting to the destruction of nature by humans. To do so, it appropriates the most diverse objects and materials, such as credit cards, used matchsticks, computer boards or sharpened pencil shavings. They are elements that bring symbolic content and, above all, aesthetic concerns.


 


Born in 1954, in the neighborhood of Itaquera, in São Paulo, SP, Miranda, son of divorced parents, attended, from 9 to 12 years old, a boarding school. It was there that he had his first experience with art. The teacher asked the children to draw a picture, and his was highlighted.


 


After that he was always called to the blackboard to draw pictures and help the teacher in class. Shortly thereafter, he began making small comic books that he sold at the fair near his house to earn some money.


He later studied illustration at the Pan American School of Art, where he was encouraged by comic book designer and illustrator Nico Rosso, who advised him to take live modeling classes at the Pinacoteca of the State of São Paulo. The weekly activity was coordinated by the artist Gregorio Gruber.


 


In the Pinacoteca course, in addition to learning a lot from drawing practice as well as listening to the comments of his teacher and colleagues, Walter Miranda started acting as a model himself. Not only there, but in other educational institutions. This activity has multiplied the opportunities to live with various artists, as well as to hear many comments in the classroom about art and drawing and painting technique.


 


At the beginning of his career, Miranda's works had a strong social aspect. The first painting he sold, for example, depicted a soldier in the foreground, a cloud of tear gas from the ground, and students running.


 


The idea was to show that it was not just a single military man who frightened young people, but a whole context that supported him and was out of the painting at the real world of the spectator.


 


At that time as a beginner artist, the lack of financial conditions to buy work material led Miranda to develop alternatives to express herself plastically. In the 1980s he developed a process in which he would break up magazines, beat the paper in a blender and, using pieces of wood as a press, create 8 mm thick bases. Then he made drawings on the bases and paintings.


 


The difficulties became advantages that encouraged him to build by himself his own studio. It is located in the São Paulo neighborhood of Sacomã. It has a very high ceiling height, seven meters, and large glass panes. World observation and practice in dealing with different materials have become a trademark. It was in this way that Walter Miranda came to the artistic use of computer boards.


 


While attending the home of his friend and sculptor Roberto Gianecchini, who worked for a French company repairing and exchanging computers, Miranda saw on the processor boards aerial views of cities. He took some to the studio and began using them in his work. Initially, he used each of them at their original size. By the time conducted research by sawing and adapting the material according to his visual objectives.


 


A constant feature of Walter Miranda's work is maps. With the end of the military dictatorship, he continued to be contestant, but his focus widened. His criticism went on to demonstrate the irresponsible way that technology has been used solely to generate money, while disregarding respect for nature. The São Paulo region where he was born, for example, which was previously full of green, became a jungle of asphalt and concrete.


 


Miranda was a teacher at the School of Arts and Crafts, from 1986 to 1995, and since 1996 teaches in his studio. His teaching activity includes drawing, watercolor, pastel, ink, human figure and painting. He also gives lectures, conferences and workshops at art in schools, cultural institutions, colleges and universities. Thanks to these activities, Miranda has been observing that there are currently many young artists with little space to exhibit. This scenario would be aggravated by universities receiving high school youth who lack basic arts training, both in practice and in theory. As a result, the four-year undergraduate degree is a too short period to provide better reference baggage, which is essential for creating a high level of knowledge that the artist can use throughout his or her career.


 


Miranda says she learned during dictatorship the importance of logic and intelligence. Since it was impossible to win by force, the alternative was to convince society by its arguments. Likewise, the more the young artist knows drawing, perspective and notions of light and shadow, the more he can unlearn, synthesizing and stylizing, to find his own form of expression.


 


Oscar D'Ambrosio - The Magazine “Unesp Ciência” - October 2014 - Pages 42 and 43.

Requiem to Gaia - Chief Seattle's Stigma


Since the 80, the ecological theme is a constant in my artistic production, as well as the incorporation of computers boards and other types of technological and electronic accessories.


 


The series REQUIEM TO GAIA treats on the current situation of the environmental degradation in the planet provoked by the actions of the human being avid for an immediate enrichment. Six circular pictures represent regions of the planet, through geographical maps, and the environmental pollution pertinent to each one. Each region is painted in a realistic way, as a detail of each work, and put inside of a glass cupola, in order to create a link that encloses the painting in itself. Mundi I, represented by a world map, it is the seventh work and approaches the materialistic character of our contemporary society.


 


The series of works was accomplished in mixed technique: oil + computer pieces and several objects on wood, besides hand written texts and plastic film of PVC (Polyvinyl chloride) to create textures and peculiar visual effects that, compared to the other elements attached to the pictures, provoke the spectator's curiosity. There is also the incorporation to the pictures of several elements of our daily technology, such as, computer boards (sawed and polished with emery), processors, chips, speakers, credit cards, clocks, keys, padlocks, cupolas of clocks, bullets, jewelries, coins, burned matches picks, peels of pointed pencil, rubber eraser bran etc; besides elements of the nature, such as, seeds, shells, snails, earth, polishes, stones, armadillo skull etc. All of this has the intention to provoke philosophical reflections on the environmental quest related to the activities of mankind in the planet.


In that sense, the six regions of the planet were filled out with remains of objects related to the characteristics of each region, in order to represent the pollution caused by the excessive consumption of materials processed by the human industry, so:


           


* In South America, I used burned match picks to represent the burning rain forest;


 


* In Europe, I used small pieces of computer plates to set up a representative visual mosaic of the several mini areas that compose the continent;


 


 * In Africa, I used sand due to the influence, remarkable of Sahara, as well as of the drought in several areas of that continent;


                       


* In North America, I used several chips and computer processors to represent the characteristic of the technological society;


                       


* In Asia, I used peels of pointed pencil to represent the manual culture that still today remains imperative in the region;


                       


* In Oceania, I used debris of computer plates to represent the dominant industrial production in this area that has been supplying the world market of electronic goods in the last decades.


 


* The world map I presents all the regions of the planet filled out with credit cards, a great symbol of the wild consumerism of the contemporary society.


 


At the background of some pictures I wrote by hand a text following lineal pattern composition specific for each work. This text, The Letter of Chief Seattle, is globally known and has a very curious history:


 


    The North American indigenous chief, Seattle, made a speech, in 1855, during a peace treaty in which the indigenous lands were sold in exchange for a reservation. That speech was witnessed by an admirer of him, Henry A. Smith, that published a text in a local newspaper in 1887, based on his memories on the speech. In 1971, the speech suffered alterations done by a scriptwriter, Ted Perry, for a documentary with ecological theme. Since then, the text of that documentary became known globally as the letter answer of Chief Seattle to the North American president, Franklin Pearce.


 


Although, the authorship is ambivalent, that communion of texts, in my opinion, presents a message for the humankind that turns itself more and more up to date. Therefore, I decided to include it in this new series of works denominated REQUIEM TO GAIA.


 


In synthesis: In my artistic production, I always try to unite the reason to the feeling (basis of my creative process), to create a work that makes use of traditional techniques incorporated to elements of our current society and that establishes several metonymical relationships in order to provoke questions on the spectator. My intention is that he reaches his own conclusions on the approached theme through a subjective language. The outcome is the complicity or the denial, it doesn't matter, because both form a kind of involvement that turn back to the essence of what I intend to transmit.


 


October/2008


 


Walter Miranda


Walter Miranda
Ateliê Oficina FWM de Artes
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